• Sep 10
    2020
    There are two simple truths when it comes to online learning: Most teachers have years of experience in the classroom, but only a few months of experience teaching virtually. Most students have never had to learn virtually, and they have no idea how to do so. We’ve spent a lot of time focusing on point number one but point number two is just as impactful to the learning experience. Students ...
  • Apr 25
    2020
    Jon O'KeefeTechnology Education JediLogical Operationshttps://www.linkedin.com/in/jonokeefe/ Jedi Jon here, According to many news outlets, even if the immediate threat from COVID-19 recedes in the coming months, it may not be until 2021 that things start to get back to normal. Where this is most likely to have the biggest impact is in education, with numerous school districts around the country considering staying closed until at least the end of the year. ...
  • Jul 07
    2014
    In his book Outliers, Malcolm Gladwell said you need 10,000 hours of deliberate practice to become an elite performer. A study that was published last week suggests that the most popular interpretation of the 10,000-hour rule - i.e., that much practice will make you an expert - is misguided. While your training course development efforts probably don't include providing for 10,000 hours of student practice, we are all interested in ...
  • Jun 23
    2014
    In these posts, I generally try to write about research, ideas, and concepts that might be useful to you. I promise to continue doing that. But from time to time, I run across something that is more interesting than useful. That’s why I wanted to share with you some new research results from MIT. The report was posted on June 18 of this year. Cognitive scientists from MIT studied the ...
  • Jun 16
    2014
    In January, I posted here about the importance of learning reinforcement in training course development. Reinforcement helps to ensure the transfer of training back to the job. "As a trainer," I wrote, "anything you can do to keep the content active in the learner's mind until it is transferred to more permanent memory will reduce the information loss and improve learning." I based this in part on remarks by Peter ...
  • Jun 09
    2014
    It's a common practice among training professionals, when planning a day-long training session, to schedule highly interactive activities right after lunch. We know that, without steady stimulus, many learners are at risk of falling asleep after a meal. It's true that a meal heavy in fat and carbohydrates can trigger a neural response that causes drowsiness. It's something most of us have experienced at Thanksgiving. But if your learners are ...
  • May 26
    2014
    Dana Blankenhorn is a blogger I've been following since before there were blogs. I don't always agree with him, but I generally find him thought-provoking. A couple weeks ago, he got me thinking much harder about online learning with a post about asynchronicity. “If you're meeting face-to-face,” Blankenhorn writes, “or you’re on the telephone with someone, or even if you’re actively text messaging back-and-forth, you are engaged in synchronous communication.” ...
  • May 19
    2014
    Traditionally, information technology training is precise. You need to show learners exactly what to do in order to get a desired result. But a recent article in Computerworld makes me think there's a trend on the horizon away from precision and toward vagueness. “The Rise of Vagueness as a Service” by Mike Elgan points out how vague systems are becoming in their interactions with us. In Apple’s Safari for iOS, ...