• Jan 10
    2018
    Sam Pfeifle | Content Director, IAPP No one wants a data breach. No one wants to be the latest ransomware victim, trying to figure out what bitcoin is so you can pay some guy in Romania to give you back access to your own data. No one wants to be THAT company. So most organizations no doubt have some kind of security training in place. That’s important. They absolutely must ...
  • Mar 14
    2017
    Browsing the web on the topic of “lifelong learning” recently, I came across an article by Nancy Merz Nordstrom: “Top 10 Benefits of Lifelong Learning.” These benefits she lists are all pretty much what you would expect. Lifelong learning promotes self-fulfillment; it opens your mind, increases your wisdom, helps you adapt to change, helps you find meaning in your life, and so on. The article didn’t explicitly touch on what ...
  • Sep 26
    2016
    Today’s PC server hardware was designed to run a single operating system, and it doesn’t matter how many processors or cores you have. This means most machines have a great deal of capacity going unused, and businesses hate waste. This is one of the reasons virtualization is so widespread in corporate IT. If you can run more than one operating system simultaneously in the same computer, you save on hardware ...
  • Sep 06
    2016
    Instinct is the propensity of a creature to engage in a defined behavior when presented with a certain stimulus. Sea turtles, for example, are born on the beach, but once hatched, they make their way immediately to the ocean. They are newborns, so it’s not something they have learned; it’s just something they do. It is a procedure, engineered by nature over countless generations of turtles, that results in the ...
  • Jun 30
    2014
    A few weeks ago, I wrote in this space about how Google's workforce is only 30% women. I was suggesting that technology training could prove to be a path to technology careers for women. This week I am writing to explain just how wrong-headed I might have been in that post. I was looking at the wrong end of the problem of gender in technology. I quoted a scholar/activist named ...
  • Jun 23
    2014
    In these posts, I generally try to write about research, ideas, and concepts that might be useful to you. I promise to continue doing that. But from time to time, I run across something that is more interesting than useful. That’s why I wanted to share with you some new research results from MIT. The report was posted on June 18 of this year. Cognitive scientists from MIT studied the ...
  • Jun 16
    2014
    In January, I posted here about the importance of learning reinforcement in training course development. Reinforcement helps to ensure the transfer of training back to the job. "As a trainer," I wrote, "anything you can do to keep the content active in the learner's mind until it is transferred to more permanent memory will reduce the information loss and improve learning." I based this in part on remarks by Peter ...
  • Jun 09
    2014
    It's a common practice among training professionals, when planning a day-long training session, to schedule highly interactive activities right after lunch. We know that, without steady stimulus, many learners are at risk of falling asleep after a meal. It's true that a meal heavy in fat and carbohydrates can trigger a neural response that causes drowsiness. It's something most of us have experienced at Thanksgiving. But if your learners are ...